Rise Leaders Radio
Silicon Mountain: Finding Multi-Stakeholder Wins in the eWaste industry

Silicon Mountain: Finding Multi-Stakeholder Wins in the eWaste industry

September 15, 2020

“It’s the ultimate win-win-win situation where we help the environment, we help businesses, we help people – the products that are sent off to other countries can help with education. There’s just such a big benefit. I wanted to show what all the opportunities are, and how individuals and companies can make a difference.” - Hillary Patterson, The Vested Group

The Unintended Impact of Constant Innovation

Today we use more electronics and gadgets than at any point in history. Electronics are used in everyday life, with people upgrading their phones to the latest model, buying new technology for their companies, homes and more. This raises the question: What happens to the waste? How can we recycle and safely dispose of it? And what does this process look like?

What is electronic waste recycling?

Joel and Hillary's education began when they started working with an electronic waste recycling business. The goal was to help them improve their effectiveness by implementing software to manage the journey of the recyclable items they received in their facility. In the end, though, they gained a new awareness of an industry with untapped potential for doing good in the world.

The creation of a business solution turned into a learning opportunity and greater purpose as they realized the impact of electronic waste and the potential for each of us to do collective good. The way we tend to our electronics’ upkeep and disposal creates a ripple effect with huge environmental, economic, and social implications.

[17:05] “Only 20% of any of the waste in the world gets recycled. So that shows you the potential of growth and the amount that can be gained by just recycling our own devices… “Such a small percentage of what’s out there that can be recycled is actually being recycled... Approximately 400,000 smartphones are thrown away every day in the United States.”

[18:14] There’s $343 million worth of gold in those phones, $46 million worth of silver. If we don't recycle that, then we have to dig that out of the earth again. The environmental ramifications are obviously ongoing and large – something that we can easily take a big chunk out of.”

On electronic recycling

[33:31] “They have almost unlimited demand for their products when they recycle and repair these items that come in. Their struggle as [an eWaste company] is getting this stuff.”

Data security:

[20:58] “As long as you're going to a certified recycler, they have the process in place…as long as you're using somebody reputable, they're going to take care of it … because their reputation is on the line as well; they're going to make sure that that that it's secure before it’s actually sent to anyone.”

Circular economy and its value
[22:47] “It’s taking something that one person has stopped using. And a lot of times people will buy the new iPhone because they want a new iPhone, not because there's anything wrong with the last one that they have. Instead of leaving it in a drawer, they’re giving it to somebody that can either sell it, refurbish it, and putting it back into the economy.”

To learn more about Joel and Hillary Patterson and The Vested Group please visit:
Joel Patterson http://www.thevested.com/meet-your-team
The Vested Group http://www.thevested.com/netsuite-provider-the-vested-group
https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-vested-group/?trk=top_nav_home
https://twitter.com/TheVestedGroup
https://www.instagram.com/thevestedgroup/
https://www.facebook.com/VestedGroup/

About the Documentary:
Premiere Information:
Date: Thursday, September 17th, 2020
Time: 7pm CST
Streamed through: http://www.siliconmountainmovie.com/

How to Talk About Race at Work

How to Talk About Race at Work

August 11, 2020

Are you having Meaningful Conversations about race?

Publishing Concepts (PCI) didn’t wait for the perfect long-term solution to address concerns about race.  Drew Clancy, President, and Lori Bishop, CPO, saw people hurting and they responded. They thoughtfully organized Meaningful Conversations as a way to talk about race.  This is their first step for improving long term trust and for healing throughout the entire workplace.

Organizations are all over the map in terms of how they’re addressing the issue of racial and social justice within their own companies. I can empathize with the feelings of uncertainty and fear of doing or saying the wrong thing.

Where do you even start?

Conversations in this domain can be delicate and deserve to be handled with care.  It takes courage, commitment, and humility to open oneself to hear the experiences of those who have been marginalized. It can be uncomfortable. 

It can also be transformational – on all levels.

Following are a few quotes and several links.  I will be following up with more podcasts and tools to help you along your journey.  Stay tuned.

I specialize in helping leaders and organizations thrive.  Reach out if there’s a way I can support you and your organization.

 

[06:28] Drew:  …what I said to them that afternoon was, I’m really just here to listen and I'm interested in your perspective. Many of these guys [African American male leaders at PCI], we’ve worked together for many years but we’d never had a conversation about race or these types of issues, and it was, I will say, for me, very eye-opening and just the level of frustration, the level of discouragement, the hopelessness in certain cases around what was going on.

Each of the men told some version of a story of growing up and a parent or maybe a grandparent saying, “When you leave this house, you need to be very careful what you say, how you act, especially around law enforcement.” After that conversation, it really struck me that the advice they were getting was you essentially have to be invisible. Again, good advice but what a message to hear.

I'm just fed up, and we've reached a moment in time when action is required here. As businesses, as a for-profit business, perhaps businesses can be on the – We can be part of the solution.

 

[10:21] Lori: I was afraid.  I have learned that I’m going to have to take off some masks... There's a level of safety and caution that I wasn't sure I can let go of and really embrace from a trust perspective. I had to tell myself, as a black person, all the things that I've heard from growing up and how my safety depended on me never trusting in white people. I had to admit that to myself before I could help Drew on this journey.

 

[19:04] Lori: … the original conversations had breakout sessions … and people are very unvarnished and open …  people are embracing it. They’re asking questions. They're doing their homework. They’re sharing stories. They’re coming into levels of self-awareness that they never thought that they would have as people, and they’re doing it at work. To be able to experience this with people has been incredibly fulfilling.

 

… and people are answering with real-life experiences. We’ve made that a rule because we don't want to start debating, as Drew says, politics and a bunch of whataboutisms and frankly just ways to stay stuck on either side of this issue. … We decided that trust was the only way to get there…

Links:

Transcript

Drew Clancy

Lori Bishop

Eric Mosley

PCI

White Fragility

Robin DiAngelo

Servant Leadership

Bob Kegan

Immunity to Change

An Everyone Culture

How To:  Build a Culture and a Thriving Business

How To: Build a Culture and a Thriving Business

September 5, 2019
Culture eats strategy for lunch
 - Peter Drucker
 
NOTE:  Show Notes on the Rise Leaders Radio web page are full of suggestions and resources related to building a thriving culture, staying relevant as your industry changes and keeping the business strong even as the personal partnership changes
 
 
Anytime Fitness Bishop Arts is in the 97th percentile of clubs in the Anytime Fitness franchise and quite easily achieved status as a Platinum Club.   Several metrics combine for this designation:  member retention, financial results, team member retention, and their PLEASE scores, which are based on the club’s alignment with corporate values.  
 
I have a colleague who likes to say, "leaders get the organizations they deserve".  Owners Jacqui Bliss and Renee Reed have a lot to be proud of and they are getting exactly what they worked hard for and thus deserve.
 
The Platinum Club accolade does not surprise me one bit.  I’ve been a member of AF BAD (Anytime Fitness Bishop Arts District) for two years and from the moment I walked in I could feel the culture.  And because my experience and their offer continues to improve, I conclude that I was not shown dogs and ponies.  It’s an easy place to be; the community is friendly and eager to support your goals.  Even with the neighborly atmosphere, the sweat pours, heart rates rise and strength is built.    
 
I always intended that the Rise Leaders Radio podcast include two ways of bringing value:  the interview itself and an accompanying article, or blog post that picks up on and extends past the content of the podcast.  These Show Notes expand on concepts and provide links to helpful resources.    
 
Here are the big ideas of the podcast:
  • Elements of their high-performing culture
  • Staying relevant in the changing world of fitness
  • How business partners get through hard time by staying focused on the future and leaning on each other’s strengths 
 
The show notes are a separate value piece and I hope you’ll read and comment!  
 
And if you feel moved, please rate Rise Leaders Radio on iTunes and leave a comment!
 
Elevate your part of the world-
 
LeeAnn
Chad West: Activating an Historical and Diverse Community and Staying Accessible

Chad West: Activating an Historical and Diverse Community and Staying Accessible

August 1, 2019

Citizenship is a chance to make a difference in the place where you belong. 

Charles Handy

 

Dallas City Council Member Chad West shares his vision, the importance of accessibility, community engagement and creating a sense of place. 

First a look behind the curtain.  I had the chance to see Chad West in action when our technology broke down and his tech-support partner had to switch out his laptop.  A half-hour ticked away, and I was getting antsy about having enough time for a meaningful interview.

This breakdown afforded me the gift of eavesdropping on Chad as he continued to work calmly with his assistant in the background, answering a few questions and ultimately delaying his next meeting so that we had enough time for the interview.

Chad had previously shared with me that he is a stickler about keeping commitments.  Integrity is high on his list of virtues.  I witnessed him walking his talk while also staying kind and generous with employees.  This recollection reassures me that we elected the right person for Oak Cliff and for Dallas.

In this interview we talked about:

  • First impressions and accessibility
  • Balancing District and City goals
  • Neighborhood engagement, communication and building trust
  • A Vision for New Urbanization

See expanded Show Notes for Reflections + Resources + Application on this episode's web page.  

Thanks for tuning in and let me hear back from you!

 

LeeAnn

 

Meaningful Work at Good Space: David Spence

Meaningful Work at Good Space: David Spence

July 17, 2019

Good work, done well for the right reasons and with an end in mind, has always been a sign, in most human traditions, of an inner and outer maturity. Its achievement is celebrated as an individual triumph and a gift to our societies.

David Whyte, Crossing the Unknown Sea

 

David shares his thoughts on meaningful work, spotting talent and the complex topic of gentrification. He riffs on developing real estate by reinvigorating beautiful old buildings and how a community developed an independent spirit.

David Spence is a commercial and residential real estate re-developer here.  His specialty is the meticulous re-imagining and re-constructing of beautiful old spaces.  If you are familiar with the area, Lucia and Dude, Sweet Chocolate are located in the Bishop Arts Building, his very first project.  This is also where the Good Space office is and where we held our interview.

David’s background and credentials include Peace Corp work in Guatemala, an MBA, a law degree and a love (and talent) for fixing up old things.  This type of intellectual horsepower, paired with a commitment to community, is not uncommon here in Oak Cliff.

In this interview we talk about:

  • The integral nature of structure, culture and individual capacities

  • The complexity of balancing progress and preservation

  • Meaningful work

  • A productivity tactic David uses to get stuff done

  • Stakeholder orientation

Be sure to check out detailed show notes with links, reflections and resources at the Rise Leaders Radio website episode page.  

Thanks for tuning in!  I hope to hear from you-

LeeAnn

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