Rise Leaders Radio
#42 What if Sales IS the Center of the Universe?

#42 What if Sales IS the Center of the Universe?

August 17, 2021

Look at sales in a very simple definition - that is delivering value for what someone needs. If you look at sales in that light, that’s a very noble profession. It starts with helping make sure that companies have the right people in their organization and Sales[people] who have the right knowledge, mindset, approach, cultural fit for the business, but also work with other areas of business.” - Chris Goade

Aligning Sales and company culture

Sales is arguably the face of the business – and foundational to an organization's success. It’s intrinsically connected to each function of the business, interfaces directly with customers, and delivers the revenue and profits necessary for growth. This is why it’s critical to develop solid sales processes and talent.

Chris Goade is the co-founder of 360 Consulting and saw an untapped market to build, rebuild, and restructure sales organizations while developing its people. He discusses the importance of a sales culture and that it aligns with company culture. This happens by finding the right people, building the right processes, and nurturing cross-functional relationships.

When done well, this creates a win-win relationship for the business and the customer.

People, Mindset, Process

 [11:09] “Work to make sure you have the right people, the right mindset, a clear understanding from everyone in the organization of what you do in sales: How do we develop leads? How do we articulate our value proposition? How do we create winning relationships?...It's a process like accounting, production, operations.”

About CRMs

[17:26] “If you start off with, 'do we have the right tool configured correctly? Do we have the right processes in there? And always keep an eye on what the ultimate goal is - this changes the whole belief system around what a CRM can mean for your business.”

Change driven by Goals and supported with Accountability

[18:54] “Get participation from everyone on the team…And now it's not just someone saying, ‘Hey, you're gonna do this,’ or ‘This is policy’… that's a whole different kind of mindset and position to come from when you start to hold people accountable…
“We don’t change for the sake of change, but change to get to the goals. … [When] they have some ownership in that in that change, then it's not so scary.”

 

For further exploration:

360 Consulting DFW : https://www.360consultingdfw.com/
Chris Goade Linked In https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-goade-535b2831/
 
To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#34 A Platform for Placemaking at Work: More Than A Cool Piece of Tech

#34 A Platform for Placemaking at Work: More Than A Cool Piece of Tech

February 22, 2021

“We have virtual real estate that makes you look and feel and act and behave as if you were in a real office. So it's not virtual reality, it's reality…the way my brain reacts and creates by changing the environment I’m in…my persona changes [while being] connected to colleagues around the world.” - Toni Portmann

Using Technology to Reduce Isolation and Build Trust
The corporate landscape in a global and post-COVID-19 world has presented many questions. One of the most important has been: How can we replicate company culture when almost no one is co-located? Though being able to work from home during a pandemic has helped boost productivity and open the talent pool beyond traditionally tight geographical lines, the issues of building culture has seen a less obvious solution.

Toni Portmann addresses this in the ingenuity that is Walkabout Workplace, a virtual reality platform encouraging positive work cultures based on human connections and place-making. It transports mind and body into the workplace through virtual real estate, simulating real-life – running into people in the hallway and having off-the-cuff banter, joining different rooms to chime in to conversations, and connecting to people in ways other than the constant Zoom meeting that reigns today.

In a world that’s moving away from commutes and increasingly going green, Toni explains how Walkabout Workplace addresses known challenges and offers additional benefits to the workplace and even to our communities.

[] “we’re not feeling connected to the world of work, or the world of community or the world of colleagues. In Walkabout, you can literally walk down the hall and drop in and have that five-minute conversation, get a question answered, say hi, have a cup of coffee, and literally feel like you're building a team.”

[18:40] "It brings us to a place ... I can log on in the morning and I and I see my colleagues... And, and who's like having stand ups...There are these times when people have either brainstorming meetings, or they're having stand ups. And that's one of the things that we're missing out on right now... unless you're invited to that conversation via a calendar, you don't even know what's going on. But from what I can tell... what I what I think will happen with Walkabout is that I can see where people are gathered. And I can just ask to join and that's part of the spontaneity of it... or someone that's in a brainstorming meeting might say, I think LeeAnn has the answer to this, let's see if we can pull her in here real quick. And they can just pull me in and release me instead of having to invite me to a meeting for 30 minutes to two hours or however that that's going to be. So for me, those are some of my favorite attributes is that it really does give a way for that spontaneity to happen."

[19:15] “It's also wicked secure. …we’ve got to be really careful of privacy of protection. We do unbelievable encryption inside the video. We also emit unbelievable encryption inside the chat channels, so that when we're having this conversation, we're encrypting within the video channel itself.”

[30:08] “Talent acquisition will change dramatically with this new accessibility…I'm no longer relegated to what my zip code is, what school I went to, or what transit I can get on. So now I can be a candidate for hire, or I can be a productive contributing employee.”

Connect to Toni Portmann:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/toni-portmann-53b454/

Walkabout Workplace
https://walkaboutworkplace.com/

The Power of Virtual Distance:
https://bookshop.org/a/16835/9781119608592

Hooked on Code:
https://hookedoncode.com/about

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#03. Chad West: Activating an Historical and Diverse Community and Staying Accessible

#03. Chad West: Activating an Historical and Diverse Community and Staying Accessible

August 1, 2019

Dallas City Council Member Chad West shares his vision, the importance of accessibility, community engagement and creating a sense of place.

 

Citizenship is a chance to make a difference in the place where you belong. 

Charles Handy

 

First a look behind the curtain. I had the chance to see Chad West in action when our technology broke down and his tech-support partner had to switch out his laptop. A half-hour ticked away, and I was getting antsy about having enough time for a meaningful interview.

This breakdown afforded me the gift of eavesdropping on Chad as he continued to work calmly with his assistant in the background, answering a few questions and ultimately delaying his next meeting so that we had enough time for the interview.

Chad had previously shared with me that he is a stickler about keeping commitments. Integrity is high on his list of virtues. I witnessed him walking his talk while also staying kind and generous with employees. This recollection reassures me that we elected the right person for Oak Cliff and for Dallas.

First Impressions and Accessibility

  • Accessibility to constituents and clients is important to Chad and is expected for a City Council Member (CM). I experienced that firsthand when he personally answered my call and accepted the podcast interview invitation without a previous introduction.
  • To balance his extreme availability, he’s sure to bake downtime into the end of his day for reading or other solitary activities.

 Balancing the Whole and Parts

  • I wondered about competing commitments between District 1 (D-1, our district) and the City’s vision and goals. 
    • Unique challenges of D1: we’re one of the oldest neighborhoods in Dallas with the original street grid, old infrastructure and tons of new development.
  • Importance of public engagement:
    • Neighborhood feedback is very important when trying to encourage developers to include pedestrian & neighborhood-friendly elements in their projects.
    • Engagement also poses challenges. People will question Chad, and rightly so.  While this creates more work, lack of engagement causes a neighborhood to lose its character.
    • Chad is working to build trust in lower-engagement neighborhoods by attending non-city events and getting to know the neighbors so that they, too, are able to influence their future.
  • Building relationships and trust with other Council Members is important for moving both the city and individual districts forward.

Holding the Vision + Integrating Thought Leadership

  • Oak Cliff is a gem with 100-year-old street-car informed grids and adjacent neighborhoods. Bishop Arts is a great example.

    • In the plans: Oak Farms, a mixed-use development with workforce housing, market-rate housing, retail, and plazas.
    • Two major streets will be repurposed. The new streetcar between downtown Dallas and North Oak Cliff, pedestrians and bicycles will be routed to one street, with cars on the other. This will improve safety and accessibility.
  • D Magazine’s New Urbanism edition included an article by Oak Cliff resident and Urbanism expert, Patrick Kennedy: Bishop Arts Can Be a Model for Southern Dallas Development
    • There’s a focus on preserving single-family neighborhoods; once you take them down you can never get them back.
    • More trail expansions are in the works, linking people with parks.
    • A strong sense of place is being ignited.

Reflections + Resources + Practical Applications

Building Trust & Relationships

  • The Trusted Advisor’s Trust Equation is a helpful way to consider trust and the components of trust. 

Holding a Long-Term Vision

  • Notice the vision for D-1 has been unfolding for 10 – 20 year.  We’re challenged to become ‘decaders’.
  • How do you and your organization stay committed and aligned to a long-term vision? What rhythms and structures have you created to support this vision?

 

Links:

https://bit.ly/2YgebFX

https://bit.ly/2Y2ucPt

https://rise-leaders.com/trust-equation

https://bit.ly/2M83y53

Rise Leaders newsletter: https://bit.ly/2LTNxzV

#02. Meaningful Work at Good Space: David Spence

#02. Meaningful Work at Good Space: David Spence

July 17, 2019

David shares his thoughts on meaningful work, spotting talent and the complex topic of gentrification. He riffs on developing real estate by reinvigorating beautiful old buildings and how a community developed an independent spirit.

 

Good work, done well for the right reasons and with an end in mind, has always been a sign, in most human traditions, of an inner and outer maturity. Its achievement is celebrated as an individual triumph and a gift to our societies.

David Whyte, Crossing the Unknown Sea

 

David Spence is a commercial and residential real estate re-developer in Oak Cliff, Dallas, TX. His specialty is the meticulous re-imagining and re-constructing of beautiful old spaces. If you are familiar with the area, Lucia and Dude, Sweet Chocolate are located in the Bishop Arts Building, his very first project. This is also where the Good Space office is and where we held our interview.

David’s background and credentials include Peace Corp work in Guatemala, an MBA, a law degree and a love (and talent) for fixing up old things.  This type of intellectual horsepower, paired with a commitment to community, is not uncommon here in Oak Cliff.

The Integral Nature of Structure, Culture and Individual Capacities

  • David cites the historic flooding of the Trinity River, which often isolated the southern sector of Dallas. This isolation required that residents develop a sense of independence and resourcefulness. This isn’t exactly the same thing as grit, but those who built successful lives in Oak Cliff likely had it.  Even today one has to work a little harder for access to services and other basics of life when they live in Oak Cliff.

A Complex Perspective

David shares experiences and opinions on balancing progress and preservation and on gentrification. These are complex topics, as opposed to complicated ones. Knowing the distinction is important if your desire is to make lasting change.

  • Progress and Preservation could also be studied through Polarity Management. In short, two positive outcomes (here, progress and preservation) are seen as opposites that can be managed rather than considering them as either/or.  The intent is to maximize the positives of each pole and minimize the negative.

Meaningful Work

As a kid, David would create useful items, like lamps, out of trashcan finds. He has always been able to see new uses for old things. Today it’s buildings – and he’s really good at it!

Our long-time interests and passions are often clues to our purpose. Have you identified yours?  How does it get expressed?

How do you feel about ‘meaningful work’, and do you have it?  How do you expand your focus and energy beyond your goals and tasks, to include elevating others? Do you find ways to invest in a community of which you are a member? 

 

Illustrations of David – What happened before recording…

Stakeholder Orientation

Before we started, David made a quick call to a residential neighbor of one of his commercial tenants, a small, thriving bar on West Davis Street. The tenant’s lease is coming up for renewal and before he renews it David wants to make sure they are good neighbors.  Parking can be an issue in Oak Cliff and the resident tells David that sometimes the bar customers infringe on his property with their parking choices. David offers to yellow-stripe the street so that this doesn’t continue to happen. This gesture serves everyone: the neighbor, David and his tenant, the thriving bar. David is a master at tending to his stakeholders.

It’s a good practice to be consistently aware of those whom your business impacts through stakeholder mapping. Most all businesses have the following stakeholders:  customers, employees, community, environment, shareholders.  Adding vendors and regulatory agencies is a common practice.

Links:

Polarity Management:

https://rise-leaders.com/polarity-management-summary-introduction/

Stakeholder map:

https://rise-leaders.com/stakeholder-map/

https://jamesclear.com/articles

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