Rise Leaders Radio
#36:  A Way of Being for Sustainable Sales Success:  Focus on Trust, Courage, Intimacy

#36: A Way of Being for Sustainable Sales Success: Focus on Trust, Courage, Intimacy

March 23, 2021

The goal of most sales books and training programs is to get more sales. The goal of trust-based selling is to help the customer…The paradox is that if you abandon attachment to the sale as the goal and instead do the sale as a fortunate byproduct, you'll actually do better.” - Charles H. Green

The trust equation
How do we measure trust? In sales and marketing, the fundamentals of interpersonal trust haven’t changed despite the digitization of the past 20 years. The mediums may change, but ultimately, it’s about people connecting with other people. While that sounds simple, in practice it can be complicated. That’s why Founder of Trusted Advisor Associates Charlie Green has distilled the elements of trust into one equation.

Charlie delves into how building trust is a boon to interpersonal and even organizational success. In our conversation, he explains and gives examples of each element of trust, the trends he sees in his work with business leaders, and how showing up for relationships authentically better serves others in the end.

Myths of trust:
[15:56] “ [that] trust takes a long time to build and a moment to destroy. Time is not the issue. Courage is the issue. It's the ability to react appropriately to the other person in the moment.”

Trust helps you serve better:
[18:07] “The problem is never what the client said it was in the first meeting. And that's not the fault of the client, they're trying to do their best job of defining what the problem is and have all their own unconscious biases…but the magic that happens between seller and buyer, if it's done right, results in a higher-level, more complex, more accurate shared problem definition. And that's a very valuable part of the consultative relationship, coming to a shared definition of what really is the problem.

Position yourself to earn trust:
[27:45] “We've all had conversations with people who are checked out, and you can feel, 'they're not paying attention to me', 'they don't care what my answer is to this'…and we don't trust those people. On the other hand, if somebody does us the grace, the dignity, the honor, the respect of actually paying attention, we’re drawn to those people. And we reciprocate and listen to what they have to say. It's a matter of respect, in a way.”

Resources mentioned in this Episode:
https://trustedadvisor.com/ videos, articles, etc.

The Trusted Advisor 20th Anniversary Edition

https://trustedadvisor.com/books
 
https://www.edelman.com/trust/2020-trust-barometer

www.rise-leaders.com/podcast Episode 17: Building Trust at Work:  The Trust Equation

https://rise-leaders.com/trust-equation-guide-2/ Trust Equation Guide

https://www.linkedin.com/in/charleshgreen/

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#27. Offering Goodness, Truth + Beauty | Sofiya Deva, This Same Sky

#27. Offering Goodness, Truth + Beauty | Sofiya Deva, This Same Sky

November 3, 2020

Sofiya Deva didn’t waver from her commitment to launch a new business, This Same Sky, even in the face of a pandemic.  She was unwilling to turn away from any of her ‘loves’ – of beauty, for supporting multi-generational artisans, ethical and sustainable fashion and her self-described geeky love of strategy and business.  I believe Jim Collins would give her an A+ in building a business with a clear Core Ideology (Vision, Purpose, Values).  

 

“We have a twofold purpose: On one hand, supporting the artisans and preserving their traditions. On the other hand, we’re trying to inspire a more intentional lifestyle for our consumers…that is more fulfilling and authentic.” - Sofiya Deva,

Founder and CEO of This Same Sky

Integrating your passions, strengths, and purpose

Not only did Sofiya Deva launch her brand, This Same Sky, in the middle of the pandemic, but she managed to masterfully integrate her loves and strengths. The company focuses on artisan-centered rotating collections of personal and home accessories, but it’s also a social enterprise that earns these multicultural artists an exceptional livelihood. Her purpose is to preserve traditional arts and crafts and remind us that we can’t forget the irrefutable value art can bring into our lives, - even in an era where minimalism is gaining traction.
One of the other passions the brand draws from? Poetry. The inspiration for the company name comes from a book of poetry of the same name. Everyone under “this same sky” lends to the sense of solidarity, that we’re all in this together. Profiling different artistic lifestyle pieces, it celebrates the distinctiveness of cultural differences while affirming a sense of unity.

When less is more, choose intentionally

[17:47] “My subtle critique to sustainability in the present moment is we have a lot of emphasis on minimalism, and less clutter, which is great, but…I think if we just negate and eliminate, without tapping into a greater sense of who we are, a greater sense of where we come from, it's incomplete for me.”

As consumers, we’re always voting with our dollars one way or the other. We understand not amassing possessions just to have them. But let’s also choose wisely, bringing things with beauty and life into our home.

The changing landscape of fashion

[25:51] “[The fashion industry] is in need of reform. But the great thing is that consumers are demanding that reform, so I think the brands that are going to deliver that reform have a competitive advantage in terms of being more desirable by consumers.”
[27:59] “Being born in the middle of a pandemic, it's forced us to be even scrappier than we would have ordinarily been, and very adaptable and very agile - and to really think through, how can we create? How can we create a diverse and flexible business model?...We leaned into collaboration and how to create win-win scenarios.”

Balance passion and self-care

[34:03] “As an entrepreneur, you have to take burnout very seriously. You have to recognize that you're not immune to burnout; you don't have infinite energy and resources. I've had some really good coaches who have helped me recognize that, actually, my energy is a really valuable resource in this project, and I need to guard it.”

As Sofiya says, it’s important to engage intentionally and assess priorities so you’re able to follow through.

Connect with Sofiya:
LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3p5B36M
Social handle: @thissamesky
Twitter - https://bit.ly/393avxo

Other mentions
This Same Sky by Naomi Shihab Nye - https://amzn.to/2MgrAe0
Guide to Reading Poetry - https://bit.ly/2Mc4G7I
Vickery Trading - https://vickerytrading.org/
Forbes article on Corporate Gifting: https://bit.ly/2Y1CkQh

Sudara - https://www.sudara.org/
Olivela - https://www.olivela.com/
Wolf and Badger - https://www.wolfandbadger.com/us/

Guide to Owning Your Value - https://bit.ly/3sJajLn

#22. Social Impact: From Idea to Enterprise

#22. Social Impact: From Idea to Enterprise

September 29, 2020

Organizations committed to sustainable change bake it into their business model.  There are a host of labels and designations for those that “do good”: conscious capitalism, social impact, social entrepreneurship, B Corp, etc. In this episode, we explore the differences and how they function. Suzanne Smith, founder & CEO of Social Impact Architects and adjunct professor at Pepperdine University and the University of Texas at Arlington unpacks it for us.

 

“[As a social entrepreneur] You don’t always do things connected to your bottom line, you don’t always have to get an immediate benefit out of something, because it’s part of who you are and your ethos - baked into your DNA.” - Suzanne Smith

The nuances of doing good

Suzanne Smith - an expert in social impact who works with nonprofits, foundations, socially responsible businesses and individuals - unpacks it all. She founded Social Impact Architects back in 2009 with a goal to reshape the business of social change.

Looking differently at social change

We discuss how social change exists in a middle space between the business world and government where neither has entirely tackled it head-on. Historically, the business sector hasn’t created enough of a market for social change, but in recent years brands look differently at how they engage. Creating change has become much deeper than charity donations and volunteering. With such a surge, it’s important for brands and individuals to rely on research-backed methods and best practices without reinventing the wheel. But it’s also important to not lose sight of what you can uniquely bring to the table.

Social entrepreneurship, charity, conscious capitalism

[8:40] “So the traditional notion of charity is the whole idea of ‘I'll give a man a fish,’ if we want to use that analogy. Social entrepreneurship changes that narrative and says, ‘You know what, let's teach a man to fish. Let's figure out how to do that to a scale.’

“We leverage the toolkit that businesses established to create market-based solutions.”

[12:22] “Social innovation is about the idea, social entrepreneurship is about the mindset, and social enterprise is about the business model.”

[21:55] “That's where I would put the conscious capitalists, those are the people who are hardwired around the idea of, we want to, we want to do a better job of creating social change. But typically, they're looking at it more from a business practice perspective, it's part of their ethos.”

The difficulty of effecting social change on a grand scale

 [10:58] The danger of starting from scratch: “Leapfrog innovation, which is yes, we want to create change, but we want to give ourselves the best chance at creating impact. So we want to build it on a solid foundation of best practice research, problem, ideation, etc. So that way, we get as much impact as we possibly can from that innovation.”

People are drawn to social change

[30:15] “I consistently look at what I purchase, and I vote with my dollar…if you look at some of the research that's been done, those companies who perform better time after time, are the ones that are socially conscious. People running those organizations are making more thoughtful decisions, they're making less decisions that are in the short run, the better decision versus the long run being the better decision.

“Companies have to start thinking about these issues. It's not just about them creating the product or service anymore… Do their employees have appropriate daycare? Are they moving their employees up in a career pathway?”

 

Her recommendation to students

[37:40] “Find that thing that they're uniquely passionate about, marry that with the thing that they are uniquely God-given from a talent point of view,”

 

Resources:

https://bit.ly/3iACis0

https://bit.ly/393hAOu

Social TrendSpotter's Newsletter:

https://socialimpactarchitects.com/newsletter-signup/

Sign up for Rise Leaders newsletter:

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#20. Silicon Mountain: Finding Multi-Stakeholder Wins in the eWaste industry

#20. Silicon Mountain: Finding Multi-Stakeholder Wins in the eWaste industry

September 15, 2020

Hillary and Joel Patterson transformed a business opportunity into a passion project.  After designing ERP solutions for clients in the electronic waste recycling industry, they jumped into the fascinating world of recycling, repair and redistribution of the electronics we regularly toss in our trash. They became SO passionate that they privately funded and produced a documentary, Silicon Mountain.

 

“It’s the ultimate win-win-win situation where we help the environment, we help businesses, we help people – the products that are sent off to other countries can help with education. There’s just such a big benefit. I wanted to show what all the opportunities are, and how individuals and companies can make a difference.” - Hillary Patterson, The Vested Group

The Unintended Impact of Constant Innovation

Today we use more electronics and gadgets than at any point in history. Electronics are used in everyday life, with people upgrading their phones to the latest model, buying new technology for their companies, homes and more. This raises the question: What happens to the waste? How can we recycle and safely dispose of it? And what does this process look like?

What is electronic waste recycling?

Joel and Hillary's education began when they started working with an electronic waste recycling business. The goal was to help them improve their effectiveness by implementing software to manage the journey of the recyclable items they received in their facility. In the end, though, they gained a new awareness of an industry with untapped potential for doing good in the world.

The creation of a business solution turned into a learning opportunity and greater purpose as they realized the impact of electronic waste and the potential for each of us to do collective good. The way we tend to our electronics’ upkeep and disposal creates a ripple effect with huge environmental, economic, and social implications.

[17:05] “Only 20% of any of the waste in the world gets recycled. So that shows you the potential of growth and the amount that can be gained by just recycling our own devices… “Such a small percentage of what’s out there that can be recycled is actually being recycled... Approximately 400,000 smartphones are thrown away every day in the United States.”

[18:14] There’s $343 million worth of gold in those phones, $46 million worth of silver. If we don't recycle that, then we have to dig that out of the earth again. The environmental ramifications are obviously ongoing and large – something that we can easily take a big chunk out of.”

On electronic recycling

[33:31] “They have almost unlimited demand for their products when they recycle and repair these items that come in. Their struggle as [an eWaste company] is getting this stuff.”

Data security

[20:58] “As long as you're going to a certified recycler, they have the process in place…as long as you're using somebody reputable, they're going to take care of it … because their reputation is on the line as well; they're going to make sure that that that it's secure before it’s actually sent to anyone.”

Circular economy and its value

[22:47] “It’s taking something that one person has stopped using. And a lot of times people will buy the new iPhone because they want a new iPhone, not because there's anything wrong with the last one that they have. Instead of leaving it in a drawer, they’re giving it to somebody that can either sell it, refurbish it, and putting it back into the economy.”

To learn more about Joel and Hillary Patterson and The Vested Group please visit:

http://www.thevested.com/netsuite-provider-the-vested-group

About the Documentary:
Premiere Information:
Date: Thursday, September 17th, 2020
Time: 7pm CST
Streamed through: http://www.siliconmountainmovie.com/

 

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design and workshop facilitation, please visit:

https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#04. Christian Chernock: Designing a Life | Building for the Future

#04. Christian Chernock: Designing a Life | Building for the Future

August 21, 2019

Christian’s success in residential development is built on lessons he learned while training as a professional golfer.  From mentors like Hank Haney and ‘Psycho Dave’ Esterbrook, he learned how to set and achieve goals, practice with intention and how to work hard.  His professional golf plans were shattered due to a back injury when he was 28 years old.  In this interview, Christian shares his journey to his current and very fulfilling life.

 

Passion is the result of a good life design, not the cause.

Bill Burnett & Dave Evans, Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life

 

I knew that Christian’s story would be interesting because while he was building his residential development business he also finished a Masters degree in Transpersonal Psychology at Naropa University in Boulder, CO. This all came on the heels of an existential exit as a professional golfer as a result of a career-ending back injury. Let all that sink in!

He now owns and operates Christian Chernock Properties, a design + build firm in Dallas that focuses on the revitalization of historic and conservation districts. His intellect and focus on sustainable and future-focused design pushes the edges – and some local residents’ buttons, too!

Christian’s background as a high performing athlete and his ongoing commitment to ‘leave it all on the field’ have been instrumental to his success.

The Details

Designing a Life: 

Unbeknownst to me, there is a term for putting intentional thought and then creating a strategy for realizing it:  Lifestyle Design. Tim Ferris coined the term in his book, The Four-Hour Work Week. I have always called it ‘visioning’ and do ‘visioning’ work with individual clients and with teams and organizations. In fact, clarity around what one is expending time and resources towards is important, especially as it evolves.

Stanford professors Bill Burnett and Dave Evans have written a fantastic book that applies design thinking principles to life and career:  Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life. 

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness means that you are conscious of various aspects of yourself: your thoughts, your feelings and emotions – including emotional and physical responses; your moods; your capabilities; your beliefs and biases; and the impact your behaviors and actions have on others, and more.

Self-awareness is a foundational skill in development and change.

Finding Flow, or Timeless Awareness

When faced with the rest of his life ahead of him and previous plans shattered, Christian asked himself where he found passion. Since childhood, he would get lost in designing and building things, first with Legos and then through architecture classes in high school.

Breaking Down Goals

Christian’s description and examples of breaking down a vision into smaller goals may be the best I’ve heard.

Luck and wishful thinking don’t make extraordinary achievements happen. We’ve heard of the saying, An overnight success that took 10 years.  Look at any level of sustainable achievement and a process like his goal-breakdown and some semblance of deliberate practice underlies it.

 

Links:

https://fourhourworkweek.com/

http://www.christianchernock.com/

http://hankhaney.com/

Rise Leaders newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

  

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