Rise Leaders Radio
#36:  A Way of Being for Sustainable Sales Success:  Focus on Trust, Courage, Intimacy

#36: A Way of Being for Sustainable Sales Success: Focus on Trust, Courage, Intimacy

March 23, 2021

The goal of most sales books and training programs is to get more sales. The goal of trust-based selling is to help the customer…The paradox is that if you abandon attachment to the sale as the goal and instead do the sale as a fortunate byproduct, you'll actually do better.” - Charles H. Green

The trust equation
How do we measure trust? In sales and marketing, the fundamentals of interpersonal trust haven’t changed despite the digitization of the past 20 years. The mediums may change, but ultimately, it’s about people connecting with other people. While that sounds simple, in practice it can be complicated. That’s why Founder of Trusted Advisor Associates Charlie Green has distilled the elements of trust into one equation.

Charlie delves into how building trust is a boon to interpersonal and even organizational success. In our conversation, he explains and gives examples of each element of trust, the trends he sees in his work with business leaders, and how showing up for relationships authentically better serves others in the end.

Myths of trust:
[15:56] “ [that] trust takes a long time to build and a moment to destroy. Time is not the issue. Courage is the issue. It's the ability to react appropriately to the other person in the moment.”

Trust helps you serve better:
[18:07] “The problem is never what the client said it was in the first meeting. And that's not the fault of the client, they're trying to do their best job of defining what the problem is and have all their own unconscious biases…but the magic that happens between seller and buyer, if it's done right, results in a higher-level, more complex, more accurate shared problem definition. And that's a very valuable part of the consultative relationship, coming to a shared definition of what really is the problem.

Position yourself to earn trust:
[27:45] “We've all had conversations with people who are checked out, and you can feel, 'they're not paying attention to me', 'they don't care what my answer is to this'…and we don't trust those people. On the other hand, if somebody does us the grace, the dignity, the honor, the respect of actually paying attention, we’re drawn to those people. And we reciprocate and listen to what they have to say. It's a matter of respect, in a way.”

Resources mentioned in this Episode:
https://trustedadvisor.com/ videos, articles, etc.

The Trusted Advisor 20th Anniversary Edition

https://trustedadvisor.com/books
 
https://www.edelman.com/trust/2020-trust-barometer

www.rise-leaders.com/podcast Episode 17: Building Trust at Work:  The Trust Equation

https://rise-leaders.com/trust-equation-guide-2/ Trust Equation Guide

https://www.linkedin.com/in/charleshgreen/

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#32. Speak Up, Stand Up | Dr. Chris Johnson on Becoming Fierce

#32. Speak Up, Stand Up | Dr. Chris Johnson on Becoming Fierce

December 22, 2020

Can your voice be heard?  Is your value being recognized?

Dr. Chris Johnson has joined me again in this episode to discuss a foundational leadership capability:  the ability to speak up about the value we personally bring to our work.  Our conviction is contagious and compelling, inspiring others to trust and believe in us as well.

 

You need to be able to take a stand. Extend your voice. Be pointedly focused on what you offer and the vision that you have, in order to impact the people that you say you want to impact.” - Dr. Chris Johnson

Confidence and the mind-body connection

Dr. Chris Johnson has joined me again in this episode to discuss a foundational leadership capability:  the ability to speak up about the value we personally bring to our work.  Our conviction is contagious and compelling, inspiring others to trust and believe in us as well.

Earlier, in episode #21, I reviewed the importance of recognizing and owning the value we bring to our work. This value will remain hidden if we're not able to confidently give voice to it.  And the way we carry ourselves is inextricably linked to it all. Chris draws from her years of embodied leadership and martial arts practice to create a commanding presence while also staying calm and centered. She shares her insights on how to expand your presence and self-awareness to ultimately project your inner strength and achieve your goals.

The tangible impact:  missed opportunities

[1:30] “The challenge about speaking up shows up in multiple ways…The most common are not sharing good ideas or opinions during meetings, not being able to promote themselves and their team. In avoiding conflict, staying silent or small leads to being undervalued and overlooked, and ultimately, to a lack of fulfillment, and possibly frustration.”

[32:44] “I'd get pulled in to take on leadership roles, and yet never fully owned them. And that was because I didn't know if I knew enough, I didn't want to hurt anybody's feelings. I didn't want anybody else to feel bad if I happen to do something really well. And all of that was a story that I told myself, and then it took residence in my body. I was very narrow, and small, my energy was very constrained.”

Centering in our body, our vision, and in action

[23:00] ] “We can either close in and hunker down…Or we can choose to learn a very simple skill and practice of centering. And by that, we mean centering in the body, relaxed…and then centering in something bigger than us, even if we don't know what that is. And lastly, centering in an action that we can then take. And once we can learn that simple practice (because you have to practice it). Pretty soon that practice starts to reshape us…

“What matters is that we’re intentional. It’s based on what we care about, and that we’re consistently in deliberate practice.”

 

[29:00] “I like to say it's tolerating the discomfort at the edges because it's at the edges that literally, our neurobiology gets rewired. Hang out there in the discomfort for at least a little bit longer. Every time we do it, we're growing new pathways that allow us to expand our capacity.”

Speaking about our accomplishments or sharing our thoughts in a meeting may bring physical sensations. We have to practice tolerating this discomfort though it feels unnatural. With time we grow accustomed to it.

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

The Power of Pause in the Mindful Leader magazine:

https://bit.ly/3ixw9wV

Episode 21: Owning Your Value | Key Elements for Authenticity and Personal Power:

https://bit.ly/3sGO0pT

A Guide to Owning Your Value:

https://bit.ly/3sJajLn

To connect to Dr. Chris Johnson please follow:

https://bit.ly/3sN2lkj

https://bit.ly/3qL3s2r

Dr. Chris on Resilience: https://bit.ly/3sOiiXs

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:

https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#31. What’s Your Cathedral Story?

#31. What’s Your Cathedral Story?

December 8, 2020

Are you completing a task or working towards a bigger vision?  If you have a Cathedral Story, your work, your goals – your life will have more meaning.

As the co-founder of Intrizen, Jonathan Haberkorn specializes in making sense of complex processes and organizing them in a way that emphasizes human interactions first.  By prioritizing the people who will be using the system and through promoting connections, Jonathan’s purpose fuels his craft.

 

If we're going to spend the majority of our time doing work, there's got to be a good reason and meaning behind it. That’s where the shift is. When you do land on where you feel like you're in line with your purpose, it is easier to see the impacts, and you become a servant of that.”
- Jonathan Haberkorn

Start with purpose

Charging you work with purpose endows you with a greater sense of congruence between your professional and personal lives. Work then goes beyond the transactional aspects; supporting a life of intention and of fulfilling the promise of your potential.

As the cofounder of Intrizen, Jonathan Haberkorn specializes in making sense of complex HR processes and organizing them in a way that emphasizes human interaction first. By prioritizing the people using the system and the process of promoting connections, he relies on purpose to fuel his craft.

The Cornerstone of The Cathedral Story is our Orientation

[13:41] “The bricklayer said, ‘I’m a bricklayer, I’m working hard to make money so I can feed my family.’ The second bricklayer said, ‘I’m a builder, I’m building a wall.’ And then the third guy says, ‘I’m a cathedral builder, I’m building a cathedral where people will worship.’ … Basically, they’re doing the same job, but the context and the orientation that they’re doing it with changes everything.
“When we see how the work that we’re doing is going to be used, what’s the long term and even the multiplier impact it can have, it really changes. It changes the quality of our work.”

We can approach our work as a series of tasks or as a meaningful part of a greater vision with many ripples.

Purpose keeps us centered and whole

[24:35] “So knowing that things don't always go to plan more times than not, and there're deviations that happen, what's our response to that? How are we going to react to it? We have the different ways we can react to it, we can be conscious about the way we're thinking and kind of deal with it and handle it and give perspective around it.”

[28:45] “I used to think, okay, this is work, and then there's home life…there's definitely different aspects of life. But once I've really found my purpose, and have completely aligned to that, it all seems like one life to me. It's all intertwining with each other.”
Purpose gives a perspective that transcends the silos of life.

Links to Intrizen and Jonathan Haberkorn:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhaberkorn/
www.intrizen.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/weareintrizen
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WeAreIntrizen/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weareintrizen/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/WeAreIntrizen

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

I specialize in helping leaders and organizations thrive.  Reach out if there’s a way I can support you.

#29. How to Own Your Attention | Seth Braun

#29. How to Own Your Attention | Seth Braun

November 24, 2020

Our attention is in demand.  It’s up to us to know how to keep it focused on what matters most so that we spend more time enjoying what’s in front of us:  other humans, nature, pets, art, etc.  Managing our attention also provides a pathway for bringing our unique gifts to the world. Join me and Seth Braun as we explore the grander implications of Attention Management and a few strategies for living and working with intention.

 

“This isn't just about squeezing more productivity out of the machine…we get discouraged, disheartened, and we give up on the things that are important to us. So one of the most important things that I see in this is to come back to what's important to me.”

– Seth Braun 
Stagen Leadership Academy

Mindful Life, Better Living

Today we have more distractions than perhaps at any time in history, with our attention bought and sold as a commodity; our electronic devices tempting us with the promise of instant gratification. With so much vying for our attention, the question becomes: How can we navigate life in a way that’s meaningful, purposeful, and creative?

Attention management is a set of practices and habits that helps us increase the time we’re present, minimize distractions, and find flow. There are 4 zones to engage in: proactive, reactive, distraction, and waste. This week Seth Braun discusses Stagen's Attention Zones model and how being mindful of these states can help us plan for and allocate time effectively. Ultimately it can help us bring our unique gifts to the world by engaging in life in a satisfying and productive way. 

Beware the Distraction and Waste Zones

[9:59] “I'm not going to tell you that Netflix is a distraction. Consider: what in your life is a distraction - and what's rejuvenating? There are certain things that I do in my family, like watching Netflix, where we laugh, and we have endorphins, and it’s rejuvenating, and it's family time. It's great. But then, where I start binge-watching and it's 11. Then it's 12…now I'm in a waste zone.”
A “lazy” activity isn’t always considered wasteful by default. Sometimes it’s what we need. However, there’s a point of diminishing returns, and we must consider the balance.

[19:20] “Most of us don’t come into the world highly disciplined, able to sit down and do the work. We need structures and practices to help us do that, including your 10-minute waste time.”
Even “wasteful” time has its place in preparing you to be proactive.

Be Guided by Your Ideals

Generally, anything in the proactive zone (with focused work) doesn’t come naturally and requires an act of volition.
[19:50] “Any act of creation or volition, whether it involves anything involving exercise or starting a business. Anything that's…creative is going to have resistance.”
[33:30] “The most important thing we can do to live a fulfilling, satisfying life is (to) have an ideal. Keep track of it each week, when we're planning our week, say, here's what's important to me, and I'm willing to go forward again.”

To learn more about Seth Braun and the Stagen Leadership Institute please visit:
https://stagen.com/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sethdbraun/

Stagen's Attention Management Core Practice Sheet
https://rise-leaders.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Stagen-Attention-Management-Core-Practice-Sheet.pdf

Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography:
https://amzn.to/396UaaS

“In Over Our Heads” - Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahey
https://amzn.to/2M792wV

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit: https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

I specialize in helping leaders and organizations thrive.  Reach out if there’s a way I can support you.

#28. A High Integrity Coaching Ecosystem | LeeAnn Mallory + Jerry Magar

#28. A High Integrity Coaching Ecosystem | LeeAnn Mallory + Jerry Magar

November 18, 2020

I called in a lifeline for this one.  I wanted to talk about the importance of a supportive ecosystem when engaging in leadership coaching and didn’t like what I was producing on my own.  So when my esteemed colleague, Jerry Magar, offered to interview me, I gladly accepted. And he delivered!

 

"The pressure and expectation of organizational leadership demand emotional maturity, requiring leaders to be willing to do their internal work…we all must move away from leading from a place of fear and lack…and move toward vision and collaboration, which results in desired and sustainable outcomes."
- LeeAnn Mallory, Founder
Rise Leaders

 

The tables got turned during this episode, and I was interviewed by Jerry Magar, a wonderful friend and colleague. He was my lifeline! Listen to find out why...

Two decades of coaching insights

Leadership coaching has become increasingly common in organizations. Because it’s a significant financial investment, it’s worth knowing what to expect and how to maximize the experience. Being aware of the situations that could benefit from coaching, and knowing the potential pitfalls before beginning, are useful to walking in confidently and ensuring it’s a rich, seamless process.

The value of coaching

The more responsibility a leader gains and the broader the scope of their leadership, the more important that they're able to develop and maintain meaningful positive relationships across the organization and outside the organization, as well as think strategically and execute against that strategy.
Leaders will hire a coach as they step into new and unfamiliar assignments and also as they face the inevitable bumps in the road. Having access to unbiased wisdom from outside the organization can provide a lifeline during times of transition and chaos. While they intuit the need to raise their awareness and increase their ability to respond to complex issues, the necessary feedback and support are often hard to come by.

A Wholehearted Approach 

 Most important to a successful coaching engagement is a motivated client who is committed to doing the work and has a learning or growth mindset. The work will be intense at times and will require courage and humility.

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources:

 https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit: 

https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

To contact Jerry Magar:
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jerrymagar/
Website: http://jerrymagar.com/about-jerry-magar/

I specialize in helping leaders and organizations thrive.  Reach out if there’s a way I can support you.  https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

Remember...Elevate Your Part of the World!

#24. Leadership, Ethnicity + Wellbeing | Renee Moorefield &  Jane Cocking

#24. Leadership, Ethnicity + Wellbeing | Renee Moorefield & Jane Cocking

October 13, 2020

Renee Moorefield and Jane Cocking share important findings from research they conducted on the relationships between leadership, ethnicity, and thriving. Based on data from 900+ leaders in the BWLW database, Black and Hispanic leaders who completed surveys about their well-being scored significantly higher than leaders who identify as white or Asian. To gain a better understanding, Jane and Renee interviewed 20+ leaders across a wide swathe of industries and ethnic identifications to unpack the data. 

 

“I succeed when we succeed, so part of my job is to amplify the well-being, the effectiveness, the success of the people around me, and in particular, to help lift up my ethnicity.’”

– Interviewee's feedback from Be Well Lead Well Pulse research

Race and the science of thriving

In the Be Well Lead Well (BWLW) Pulse model, thriving is defined as 'having the internal resourcefulness to meet external complexities and demands'. Renee Moorefield, the creator of the Be Well Lead Well Pulse wellbeing assessment, and Jane Cocking an executive coach and BWLW certified guide share important findings from research they conducted on the relationships between leadership, ethnicity, and thriving.

Certain themes emerged…

Resilience

The respondents gave striking insights on inner strengths were built naturally – a byproduct of not living in the dominant culture:

[19:18] “We heard that a lifetime of challenges for leaders who identify as Black or Hispanic have enabled them through the hardships they've had in this dominant culture, whether that's a door shut in their face, whether that's discrimination, or whether that's microaggressions. You can think of all the things we're hearing about in society that have enabled them to build a level of resilience within themselves, coping mechanisms to just live in this culture. It's also enabled them to build a sense of identity beyond that white dominant culture of success.

“So it’s a way of seeing themselves that goes beyond this culture. And it's also built within them a connection to their internal capacities.”

 

[25:43] “… Under stress, growth occurs. In the situation of these people we were talking to, they would say, ‘The reason I got to where I am as an executive, is because I drew from all of those experiences – me knowing who I am and what creates well-being for me enabled me to become and grow as a leader'."

 

Not everyone’s version of success is the same

[17:19] “Overwhelmingly, we heard, no matter the race of the person, that we are all living in a white model of success…

“The white model is you have to be productive, you have to achieve, in order to be successful. If you're not productive and successful, then maybe you're lazy. Acquiring wealth is important, the status of your job title or where you live or what car you drive – the status and very much a ‘me’ culture.”

 

These individuals have a story

[34:43] “’What I would love everyone to know what I believe about myself is that I'm fully human and humane. And as a black executive, when I operate in the world, I often don't get treated as fully human, I get treated as an asset or sort of marginalized voice.’”

[38:33] “The people I talked to who identified as black or Hispanic knew a lot about their own history, their story, they had a connection for hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years back.”

 

Resources:

Be Well Lead Well Pulse Well-being assessment:

https://bit.ly/2LT7wPg

#6: An Essential Link: Wellbeing and Leader Effectiveness

https://bit.ly/362O7SS

 

Renee on Star Coach Show, Episode 141 Be Well, Lead Well

https://bit.ly/3qJqZRo

Connect to Renee and Jane:

Renee Moorefield https://bit.ly/3qABI0a

Jane Cocking https://bit.ly/3cdCDjt

 

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:

https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

#21. Owning Your Value | Key Elements for Authenticity and Personal Power

#21. Owning Your Value | Key Elements for Authenticity and Personal Power

September 22, 2020
There are times in our professional lives where we need to advocate for ourselves. – to take a stand. Recognizing our worth and being able to communicate it isn’t rude, nor is it bragging.  But it can be uncomfortable.  Owning our value supports our authenticity, which liberates our spirit and launches excellent performance. 
 
“When we're able to own our value, we're more likely to bring positive contributions to work, life, our communities, to whatever we care about.” 
 

Benefit from knowing who you are

There are times in our professional lives where we need to advocate for ourselves. – to take a stand. Recognizing our worth and being able to communicate it isn’t rude, nor is it bragging.  But it can be uncomfortable.  Owning our value supports our authenticity, which liberates our spirit and launches excellent performance. Communicating our value is necessary to get a seat at the table. We make the value we bring apparent when we confidently acknowledge and demonstrate it each day – and it also helps us bring our unique advantage to the workplace.
 

Explore the Eight Elements of Knowing Your Value

This week’s episode is an efficient 13 minutes as I outline 8 elements to help you own and speak your value. These are actions you can take to increase your feelings of power and authenticity in all aspects of life. I’ve created an in-depth, integrated guide for your reflection and to help you develop new habits.   Whether you’re mentoring someone or need strategies for realizing your own impact, you will achieve greater awareness of what you offer and how to communicate it.
 

Highlights from this episode

[2:30] “Know what you stand for…what you care about and what you're committed to. These values guide your decisions, your actions and your priorities. Have clarity around your vision.”
 
[3:30] “Knowing what we stand for keeps us in our lane, focused on what we care about rather than pursuing what others are striving for.”
 
[6:53] “Track your contributions. These are quote receipts of your good work. I do this daily in my journal to remind myself that I spent my time well, and so I can articulate the deliverables that I'm working on with clients.”
 
[8:51] “To go along with speaking your value is to practice embodying your value. Embodying your value means that you feel it at your core, and others also feel it and see it in your presence.”
 
 
A Guide to Owning Your Value:  
 
Episode 19: Trudy Bourgeois about workforce excellence: https://rise-leaders.com/achieving-workforce-excellence-trudy-bourgeois/
 
Clifton Strengths Assessment: 
 
Tilt 365:
 
To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design and workshop facilitation, please visit:
#16. High Fidelity Conversations: Nine elements to launch culture change

#16. High Fidelity Conversations: Nine elements to launch culture change

August 18, 2020

These types of conversations are High Fidelity because they provide strength and resonance for the people who engage in them.  They’re designed to support the Core Ideology of the organization and especially support the people experiencing the change. LeeAnn describes nine elements important for launching these conversations.

 

“Waiting until you have created the perfect, most elegant solution keeps you out of today’s game. Launch it!” 

High Fidelity Conversations Support Culture Change

Organizations are constantly changing due to both internal and external events.

Mergers and acquisitions, disruptive technology, and various economic pressures, like those brought on by the Covid pandemic are prime examples. This year, in addition to facing a pandemic, the US had to deal with hard truths on racial injustice, and the need to address the topic in the workplace was no longer avoidable.

On a previous Podcast episode, How to Talk About Race at Work, Drew Clancy and Lori Bishop shared how they tackled the topic head-on at PCI.  They explained why they didn’t wait for the perfect long-term solution to address concerns about race and how they tied the conversations to their values and focus on increasing trust throughout the organization.

Whether your goal is to step fully into conversations about race, or to committing to the successful adaptation of a critical change to your culture, it’s important to provide strength, alignment, and resonance, – or fidelity – for the people who engage in them.

Do you know how to provide the proper framework for these delicate conversations?

This entire episode has been created to guide leaders on how to begin culture change in their organization by following these nine actionable concepts for designing high fidelity conversations.

A Few Elements from the Guide Described in the Episode

05:52 - "Create a vision that everyone can see themselves in. And what that means is, create a compelling future that matters for people. People need to see how the change is going to benefit them and the organization long term." 

07:26 - "And with conversations, that means listening and learning and being open to other points of view."

10:36 - "Waiting will keep you out of the game today. And you want to balance this immediate action with the longer-term creation of policies and structures that provide resistance-free solutions."

11:43 - "Naming the effort gives people language for how to refer to the change".

For more resources highlighted in this audio episode please follow the links below:

Episode 15: How to Talk About Race at Work
https://rise-leaders.com/how-to-talk-about-race-at-work/

Launching Culture Change through Hi-Fidelity Conversations guide:

https://rise-leaders.com/hi-fi-conversations-icons/

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design and workshop facilitation please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

 

To subscribe to the Rise Leaders newsletter for more resources: https://mailchi.mp/426e78bc9538/subscribe

#15. How to Talk About Race at Work

#15. How to Talk About Race at Work

August 11, 2020

Publishing Concepts (PCI) didn’t wait for the perfect long-term solution to address concerns about race.  Drew Clancy, President, and Lori Bishop, CPO, saw people hurting and they responded. They thoughtfully organized Meaningful Conversations as a way to talk about race.  This is their first step for improving long term trust and for healing throughout the entire workplace.

 

“What we’re creating here is, first and foremost, just living our values. Just being who we say we are and digging deeper as it relates to the structural racism that we have all been forced to live in here in the United States...” 

Lori Bishop, CPO, Publishing Concepts – PCI
 

“I think this calls for leadership and leaning into it… I think it’s a tremendous opportunity to ultimately strengthen the culture of the organization and have better conversations, better relationships, a stronger organization.”  

Drew Clancy, President, Publishing Concepts – PCI

 

Where do you even start?

Conversations in this domain can be delicate and deserve to be handled with care. It takes courage, commitment, and humility to open oneself to hear the experiences of those who have been marginalized. It can be uncomfortable. 

Start By Listening to Experiences

[06:28] Drew: …what I said to them that afternoon was, I’m really just here to listen and I'm interested in your perspective. Many of these guys [African American male leaders at PCI], we’ve worked together for many years but we’d never had a conversation about race or these types of issues, and it was, I will say, for me, very eye-opening and just the level of frustration, the level of discouragement, the hopelessness in certain cases around what was going on.

Each of the men told some version of a story of growing up and a parent or maybe a grandparent saying, “When you leave this house, you need to be very careful what you say, how you act, especially around law enforcement.” After that conversation, it really struck me that the advice they were getting was you essentially have to be invisible. Again, good advice but what a message to hear.

I'm just fed up, and we've reached a moment in time when action is required here. As businesses, as a for-profit business, perhaps businesses – We can be part of the solution.

Vulnerability + Courage

[10:21] Lori: I was afraid. I have learned that I’m going to have to take off some masks... There's a level of safety and caution that I wasn't sure I can let go of and really embrace from a trust perspective. I had to tell myself, as a black person, all the things that I've heard from growing up and how my safety depended on me never trusting in white people. I had to admit that to myself before I could help Drew on this journey.

Structure Your Conversations About Race

[19:04] Lori: … the original conversations had breakout sessions … and people are very unvarnished and open … people are embracing it. They’re asking questions. They’re doing their homework. They’re sharing stories. They’re coming into levels of self-awareness that they never thought that they would have as people, and they’re doing it at work. To be able to experience this with people has been incredibly fulfilling.

… and people are answering with real-life experiences. We’ve made that a rule because we don’t want to start debating, as Drew says, politics and a bunch of whataboutisms and frankly just ways to stay stuck on either side of this issue. …We decided that trust was the only way to get there…

Links:

Transcript:

https://bit.ly/39256Xb

Drew Clancy:

https://bit.ly/3p4CkL8

Lori Bishop:

https://bit.ly/3p4KMtN

Eric Mosley:

https://bit.ly/3o1ODqu

PCI:

https://bit.ly/2XXKLvV

White Fragility:

https://amzn.to/2LTxh1I

Robin DiAngelo:

https://bit.ly/39VJ5IL

Servant Leadership:

https://bit.ly/2M6h1u8

Bob Kegan:

https://bit.ly/3p3gU14

Immunity to Change:

https://amzn.to/2LGviOv

An Everyone Culture: 

https://amzn.to/3qDnqMh

Visit Rise Leaders:

https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

#05. How To: Build a Culture and a Thriving Business

#05. How To: Build a Culture and a Thriving Business

September 5, 2019
Jacqui Bliss and Renee Reed, owners of Anytime Fitness Bishop Arts District share how they’ve built a great culture through relationship-based leadership and continuous learning.  We also talk about how they stay relevant in a changing industry and their experience in growing the business even as their own relationship was tested.
 
Culture eats strategy for lunch
 - Peter Drucker

 

Anytime Fitness Bishop Arts is in the 97th percentile of clubs (of 2,475 clubs) in the Anytime Fitness franchise system and quite easily achieved status as a Platinum Club. Several metrics combine for this designation: member retention, financial results, team member retention, and their PLEASE scores, which are based on the club’s alignment with corporate values.

I have a colleague who likes to say, leaders get the organizations they deserve. Owners Jacqui Bliss and Renee Reed have a lot to be proud of and they are getting exactly what they worked hard for and thus deserve.

A Creative vs Reactive Orientation

Jacqui and Renee articulated over and over what they cared about and what they want to bring into being during our conversation. This way of thinking is called a Creative Orientation. Quite simply, keeping your sights on goals, vision, values, and purpose results in more passion and less drama; more sustainable results and fewer rollercoaster rides. Leaders who lead this way build motivated, inspired and high-achieving organizations.

An Inclusive Environment

Inclusion and diversity are powerful words these days. The AF BAD club is a microcosm of Oak Cliff, with all the shapes, sizes, ages, races, gay, straight, trans, and decorated people you can imagine. If you’re not comfortable with all that, this probably isn’t the place for you. 

Inclusion is good for business and good for humankind.

Staying Relevant

Most industries have experienced significant shifts in the past decade or so – just look at the retail, taxi, and news industries as proof. The fitness industry is no exception. 

Renee and Jacqui stay relevant by:

  • Investing in leadership and organizational development.
  • Committing wholeheartedly to their decisions
  • Updating equipment and renovating the space.
  • Always researching and learning
  • Using Social Media in positive ways to tell good stories.

If you want to make it in today’s world it requires constant evolution.

Navigating Partnerships 

Renee and Jacqui beautifully illustrate a new composition. With the same dedication and commitment with which they seem to run the rest of their life, they have made their way to a very positive and respectful business collaboration. They are also parents to an exceptional son and they’re doing a fantastic job in their shared parenting – vacationing and spending holidays together as a family.

Based on the success Jacqui and Renee have experienced in their situation, here are a few questions to consider if you find yourself in one that is similar:

  • Re-assess your vision for the business. Do you still feel strongly about it and want it to succeed?
  • When the emotional dust particles settle, is your business partner someone who you respect and who you feel has a similar work ethic? Was the business partnership working, even if the life partnership wasn’t? 
  • Are you willing to ‘do your work’ and learn about your contributions to the breakdown and declare to improve in those areas?
  • Can you move past the hurt and work without resentment?

I’m not an expert in this matter, but it seems if you can answer ‘yes’ to these questions you have a good starting point for the next iteration of your evolving business.

 
Links:
Anytime Fitness:
 
Creative Orientation:
 

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