Rise Leaders Radio
Silicon Mountain: Finding Multi-Stakeholder Wins in the eWaste industry

Silicon Mountain: Finding Multi-Stakeholder Wins in the eWaste industry

September 15, 2020

“It’s the ultimate win-win-win situation where we help the environment, we help businesses, we help people – the products that are sent off to other countries can help with education. There’s just such a big benefit. I wanted to show what all the opportunities are, and how individuals and companies can make a difference.” - Hillary Patterson, The Vested Group

The Unintended Impact of Constant Innovation

Today we use more electronics and gadgets than at any point in history. Electronics are used in everyday life, with people upgrading their phones to the latest model, buying new technology for their companies, homes and more. This raises the question: What happens to the waste? How can we recycle and safely dispose of it? And what does this process look like?

What is electronic waste recycling?

Joel and Hillary's education began when they started working with an electronic waste recycling business. The goal was to help them improve their effectiveness by implementing software to manage the journey of the recyclable items they received in their facility. In the end, though, they gained a new awareness of an industry with untapped potential for doing good in the world.

The creation of a business solution turned into a learning opportunity and greater purpose as they realized the impact of electronic waste and the potential for each of us to do collective good. The way we tend to our electronics’ upkeep and disposal creates a ripple effect with huge environmental, economic, and social implications.

[17:05] “Only 20% of any of the waste in the world gets recycled. So that shows you the potential of growth and the amount that can be gained by just recycling our own devices… “Such a small percentage of what’s out there that can be recycled is actually being recycled... Approximately 400,000 smartphones are thrown away every day in the United States.”

[18:14] There’s $343 million worth of gold in those phones, $46 million worth of silver. If we don't recycle that, then we have to dig that out of the earth again. The environmental ramifications are obviously ongoing and large – something that we can easily take a big chunk out of.”

On electronic recycling

[33:31] “They have almost unlimited demand for their products when they recycle and repair these items that come in. Their struggle as [an eWaste company] is getting this stuff.”

Data security:

[20:58] “As long as you're going to a certified recycler, they have the process in place…as long as you're using somebody reputable, they're going to take care of it … because their reputation is on the line as well; they're going to make sure that that that it's secure before it’s actually sent to anyone.”

Circular economy and its value
[22:47] “It’s taking something that one person has stopped using. And a lot of times people will buy the new iPhone because they want a new iPhone, not because there's anything wrong with the last one that they have. Instead of leaving it in a drawer, they’re giving it to somebody that can either sell it, refurbish it, and putting it back into the economy.”

To learn more about Joel and Hillary Patterson and The Vested Group please visit:
Joel Patterson http://www.thevested.com/meet-your-team
The Vested Group http://www.thevested.com/netsuite-provider-the-vested-group
https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-vested-group/?trk=top_nav_home
https://twitter.com/TheVestedGroup
https://www.instagram.com/thevestedgroup/
https://www.facebook.com/VestedGroup/

About the Documentary:
Premiere Information:
Date: Thursday, September 17th, 2020
Time: 7pm CST
Streamed through: http://www.siliconmountainmovie.com/

Achieving Workforce Excellence |  Trudy Bourgeois: Equality,  Inclusion + Diversity Expert

Achieving Workforce Excellence | Trudy Bourgeois: Equality, Inclusion + Diversity Expert

September 8, 2020

When you see something that is not right, not fair, not just, you have to speak up. You have to say something; you have to do something. 

John Lewis

 

Trudy Bourgeois came to the work of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) reluctantly.  She wanted 'nothing to do with' previous ineffective efforts to improve DEI in organizations.  Yet the work kept calling her.  As a former executive in a Fortune 500 consumer products company she brings pragmatism and passion. And results.

Here's what to pay attention to as you listen to the episode today: first, where she sees hope for the changing landscape in terms of equity in organizations. Second, listen to Trudy's perspective on how to own the value that you bring to your organization so that you can speak with authenticity and with power. This is particularly for women of color and women in general. Third, listen for Trudy's perspective on the role of white and black women in moving the equity conversation forward.

[09:31]:  This is not new. What is new is that through the power of a smartphone, people had an emotional connection. Their consciousness was touched. I think that organizations would say many of them, that they were on the journey. I would humbly submit that they might have been on the journey, they hadn't gone very far.

 

So many of them would say, it's a business imperative. I don't know as a former line manager, I don't know what business imperative would go unresolved for 50 years and people would keep their jobs.

[15:45]: If people realize, you spend the largest percentage of your life at work. Why do you want to wake up every day and put a mask on and go pretend to be somebody that you're not, just so that you can get a paycheck? If your value is that good, then you know what? Your attitude, it should always be, “I am choosing to give my gifts and talents and add my value and impact here. I’m not being held hostage to stay here. I’m making a choice.”

[18:49] ...   organizations talk about innovation, yet when you stifle people and you put them in a box and then they get scared and then they don't know their value, you're not going to have any innovation and you're sure not going to have any collaboration. You sure are not going to have all the things that people write up about how they want to function as a company, but this notion of knowing your value is so important. It's important for everybody, that it's especially important for women and people of color.

 

[28:42]  ... I am specifically calling on women, us, to stop pointing the finger at men and the lack of progress that we've made. This is not to suggest that we don't need male champions, but I am calling on us to have the courageous conversation. 

 

Trudy Bourgeois https://workforceexcellence.com/trudy/

Center for Workforce Excellence  https://workforceexcellence.com/

Equality:  Courageous Conversations About Women, Men and Race to Spark a Diversity and Inclusion Breakthrough

https://www.amazon.com/Equality-Courageous-Conversations-Diversity-Breakthrough/dp/1976596335/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1X53JAOD87D10&dchild=1&keywords=trudy+bourgeois&qid=1599318403&sprefix=trudy+bour%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-1

HBR:  Why Diversity Efforts Fail https://hbr.org/2016/07/why-diversity-programs-fail

Questioneering, Joseph Bradley  https://www.amazon.com/Questioneering-Model-Innovative-Leaders-Digital/dp/1944027440/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=joseph+bradley&qid=1599318601&sr=8-8

 

https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2020/06/share-the-mic-now-instagram-campaign

Using Poetry to Expand Perspective | Start Close In

Using Poetry to Expand Perspective | Start Close In

September 1, 2020

Good literature has the power to help us better understand the human condition. Poetry and other creative writing evokes something deep in us, it widens our perspective and helps us connect with parts of ourselves (and others) that otherwise we wouldn't have easy access to.

Poetry can also be a powerful developmental tool to help leaders and 'Type A' personalities transcend the linear and analytical world of business. Rick Voirin has incorporated poetry in his coaching and leadership work since the '90s and has seen firsthand the profound impact that it can have on professional growth and self-development. In this special episode, LeeAnn and Rick discuss the work of author and poet David Whyte, and how the poem "Start Close In" directs us to take the first step that leads to change.

24:53 - " If we really engage something, whether it's a poem or a piece of art or a piece of literature or something that's happening on a screen In front of us in a movie, the first approximation is just the way that the information lands in our senses. And then what starts to show up as we relate with that, that happens, like in a back and forth conversation."

27:25 - "Poetry or good literature is an invitation into a deeper relationship with life, a deeper reflection on the meaning of one's life. And what one is caring about (...) and what one might intend to do with one's wild and precious life." 

29:24 - "When I try to start big, it's probably because I'm seeking an excuse to get out of doing anything. The big stuff is beyond my reach, at least at the moment. But if I start close in, I'll find things I can do right now." 

Resources Mentioned on this Podcast:

A Guide for Reading Poetry

https://rise-leaders.com/a-guide-for-poetry/

The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America, by David Whyte
https://www.amazon.com/Heart-Aroused-Preservation-Corporate-America/dp/0385484186
Interview with Bonnie Pittman:
https://rise-leaders.com/awe_art_observation_bonnie_pitman/
Connect to Rick Voirin:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/rick-voirin-a43413/
David Whyte's work:
https://www.davidwhyte.com/
David Whyte reading Start Close In:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=030YqrN4SFc
How to Talk about Race at work:
https://rise-leaders.com/how-to-talk-about-race-at-work
Start Close In - The On Being Project
https://onbeing.org/blog/start-close-in/

Building Trust at Work: The Trust Equation

Building Trust at Work: The Trust Equation

August 25, 2020

High Trust environments invite people to focus their precious energy and passion on creating and delivering value rather than on managing politics, their reputation and their image.

The ability to show up authentically and to openly collaborate creates a path of least resistance.  The lack of friction produces freedom and flow. In high-trust organizations, people show up as their authentic selves, maximizing teamwork and solid relationships.

So how do you go about creating a high-trust environment? A quick search on Amazon for books on Trust reveals over 80,000 titles; narrowing the search to building trust gives us over 10,000 results. There is no shortage for approaches and models for Trust.

In this episode, we delve into Charles Green's Trust Equation, a model that illustrates distinct, yet nuanced elements of trustworthiness. You'll have the opportunity to explore the level of trustworthiness in one of your relationships from three different perspectives by using the Trust Equation.

05:06 - "(...) think of all models as a trellis.  They give us something to hold on to - a structure for growth and reaching out.  And not to get too deep with the metaphor, but we also need to remember to clear out the dead stuff that no longer serves the living organism."     

06:50 - "Both credibility and reliability can be observed, or measured, and take less emotional energy than intimacy. (...) David Brooks calls these ‘resume virtues’ – their knowledge, experience, abilities." 

09:25 - "Self-orientation – Take a moment to reflect on the term, self-orientation.  What do you think of when you think of someone who is self-oriented?"  

14:26 - "Use the equation as a journaling tool, using the initial ratings as a starting point and going deeper from there. (...) Focus on yourself and raising your own rating.  You can even ask someone whom YOU trust to share their ratings of you."

How did you do? What were the most surprising results?

For more resources highlighted in this episode please visit the links below:

A Guide to the Trust Equation:  

https://rise-leaders.com/trust-equation-guide-2/

Episode 15: How to Talk About Race at Work
https://rise-leaders.com/how-to-talk-about-race-at-work/
Charles Green: The Trusted Advisor on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Trusted-Advisor-David-H-Maister/dp/0743212347/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Charles+Green%27s+The+Trusted+Advisor&qid=1597958450&sr=8-2

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design and workshop facilitation please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

High Fidelity Conversations: Nine elements to launch culture change

High Fidelity Conversations: Nine elements to launch culture change

August 18, 2020

Organizations are constantly changing due to both internal and external events.

These events include mergers and acquisitions, disruptive technology, and various economic pressures, like the one we are currently living through. This year, in addition to facing a pandemic, the US had to deal with hard truths on racial injustice, and the need to address the topic in the workplace was no longer avoidable.

On a previous Podcast episode, How to Talk About Race at Work, Drew Clancy and Lori Bishop shared how they tackled the topic head-on at PCI, and explained why they didn’t wait for the perfect long-term solution to address concerns about race.

Whether your focus is on stepping fully into conversations about race or committing to another critical change to your culture, it's important to provide strength, alignment, and resonance, or fidelity, for the people who engage in them. Do you know how to provide the proper framework for these delicate conversations?

This episode has been entirely designed to guide leaders on how to launch culture change in their organization, by applying nine actionable concepts to achieve safe (or high fidelity?) conversations at work.

05:52 - "Create a vision that everyone can see themselves in. And what that means is, create a compelling future that matters for people. People need to see how the change is going to benefit them and the organization long term." 

07:26 - "And with conversations, that means listening and learning and being open to other points of view."

10:36 - "Waiting will keep you out of the game today. And you want to balance this immediate action with the longer-term creation of policies and structures that provide resistance-free solutions."

11:43 - "Naming the effort gives people language for how to refer to the change".

For more resources highlighted in this audio episode please follow the links below:

Episode 15: How to Talk About Race at Work
https://rise-leaders.com/how-to-talk-about-race-at-work/
Launching Culture Change through Hi-Fidelity Conversations guide: https://rise-leaders.com/hi-fi-conversations-icons/

To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design and workshop facilitation please visit:
https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

How to Talk About Race at Work

How to Talk About Race at Work

August 11, 2020

Are you having Meaningful Conversations about race?

Publishing Concepts (PCI) didn’t wait for the perfect long-term solution to address concerns about race.  Drew Clancy, President, and Lori Bishop, CPO, saw people hurting and they responded. They thoughtfully organized Meaningful Conversations as a way to talk about race.  This is their first step for improving long term trust and for healing throughout the entire workplace.

Organizations are all over the map in terms of how they’re addressing the issue of racial and social justice within their own companies. I can empathize with the feelings of uncertainty and fear of doing or saying the wrong thing.

Where do you even start?

Conversations in this domain can be delicate and deserve to be handled with care.  It takes courage, commitment, and humility to open oneself to hear the experiences of those who have been marginalized. It can be uncomfortable. 

It can also be transformational – on all levels.

Following are a few quotes and several links.  I will be following up with more podcasts and tools to help you along your journey.  Stay tuned.

I specialize in helping leaders and organizations thrive.  Reach out if there’s a way I can support you and your organization.

 

[06:28] Drew:  …what I said to them that afternoon was, I’m really just here to listen and I'm interested in your perspective. Many of these guys [African American male leaders at PCI], we’ve worked together for many years but we’d never had a conversation about race or these types of issues, and it was, I will say, for me, very eye-opening and just the level of frustration, the level of discouragement, the hopelessness in certain cases around what was going on.

Each of the men told some version of a story of growing up and a parent or maybe a grandparent saying, “When you leave this house, you need to be very careful what you say, how you act, especially around law enforcement.” After that conversation, it really struck me that the advice they were getting was you essentially have to be invisible. Again, good advice but what a message to hear.

I'm just fed up, and we've reached a moment in time when action is required here. As businesses, as a for-profit business, perhaps businesses can be on the – We can be part of the solution.

 

[10:21] Lori: I was afraid.  I have learned that I’m going to have to take off some masks... There's a level of safety and caution that I wasn't sure I can let go of and really embrace from a trust perspective. I had to tell myself, as a black person, all the things that I've heard from growing up and how my safety depended on me never trusting in white people. I had to admit that to myself before I could help Drew on this journey.

 

[19:04] Lori: … the original conversations had breakout sessions … and people are very unvarnished and open …  people are embracing it. They’re asking questions. They're doing their homework. They’re sharing stories. They’re coming into levels of self-awareness that they never thought that they would have as people, and they’re doing it at work. To be able to experience this with people has been incredibly fulfilling.

 

… and people are answering with real-life experiences. We’ve made that a rule because we don't want to start debating, as Drew says, politics and a bunch of whataboutisms and frankly just ways to stay stuck on either side of this issue. … We decided that trust was the only way to get there…

Links:

Transcript

Drew Clancy

Lori Bishop

Eric Mosley

PCI

White Fragility

Robin DiAngelo

Servant Leadership

Bob Kegan

Immunity to Change

An Everyone Culture

Re-goal and Reframe for Resilience:  Gloria Park PhD

Re-goal and Reframe for Resilience: Gloria Park PhD

July 14, 2020

As an applied positive psychology and sport and performance psychology practitioner, Gloria Park, PhD is uniquely qualified to speak about how we continue to learn, grow, evolve, and even thrive in the face of challenge. And we are certainly being challenged in 2020! Gloria shares transformative skills and strategies during the interview.  For more exploration, many links to resources are provided in the show notes.

It’s easy to get overwhelmed these days while we’re in the middle of the Covid-19 crisis and also trying to thoughtfully enter and positively impact the domain of racial injustice.   

In April I attended a webinar co-lead by Gloria.  It was very timely given the newness and shock concerning Covid-19. When I first heard the term, ‘re-goaling’, I thought, YES!, this is how I would describe the thoughtful and intentional shift I see some people making.  It’s different from simply reacting. Re-goaling means that I consciously disengage from the old goal and thoughtfully create a new goal. It also means that I feel and acknowledge the continuum of emotions and engage in hope.   In this interview, we explore ways to our own resilience.

A few quotes that stand out for me:

11:31 - "…everyone is dealing with this very deep sense of grief about things that matter deeply to them and now look no longer like they used to…the second place where people are really struggling is the uncertainty." 

13:43 - "…what gives me hope is that people are finding things to be hopeful about despite all of the uncertainty and despite all of the grief…"

26:36 – "But if you think about the average person and the goals we set for ourselves, we set those goals because they’re a reflection of things that are really valuable to us and they’re often tied, especially in the performance domain, deeply to our sense of self-worth and our identities, and you wouldn’t have set those goals if they didn’t mean a lot to you."

C.R. Snyder’s Hope Theory:  "People feel hope whey they have three things:  they have a goal that they’re focused on; they have beliefs that they have the capacity within them to strive towards that goal; and that there are avenues available for them to be able to pursue those goals."

29:38 – "A lot of the foundation of resiliency training, as well as a lot of the foundation for performance psychology, is about understanding the connections between those three things:  your thoughts, your emotions, and your behaviors."

43:51 – "But the accomplishments will always be there.  The world will be there to await you to show up and be able to strive towards those things again.  I think, right now, we really need to be paying attention to our wellbeing and figure out how we can support our families and support our employees in an organizational context to really help them navigate this crisis successfully."

We’ve all heard of SMART goals (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Time-driven); Gloria is also an advocate for DUMB goals! (42:05)

Find resources on resilience at Eudaimonic by Design, especially Choosing Optimism:  The Art of the Reframe.  Also, find Embodied Resilience and Hope.

Register for this FREE course on resilience: Resilience Skills in a Time of Uncertainty offered by the University of Pennsylvania.  Gloria is one of the instructors and her mentor, Karen Reivich is the primary instructor.   

Sign up for my newsletter at   to receive more links and resources!

3 Vital Questions for Transformative Results:  David Emerald

3 Vital Questions for Transformative Results: David Emerald

May 11, 2020

Ask these 3 Powerful Questions

... when facing change, feeling stuck or dealing with workplace drama.  They'll help you level up the results you get.

  1. Where are you placing your focus?
  2. How are you relating?
  3. What actions are you taking?

 Read extended show notes on Rise Leaders Radio website

David has followed up his wildly popular and super sticky book, TED: The Empowerment Dynamic with 3 Vital Questions: Transforming Workplace Drama.  When we answer these questions and upshift our perspective, we become more resilient and more likely to create the results we desire. 

This just in:  David has won the Independent Press Award's Distinguished Favorites of 2020 for 3 Vital Questions!

Energy Follows Attention

We're built for survival.  Our default mode is to scan for danger and then react.  If we want to create a wonderful life and build great places to work, then we have to move past problem-solving.  We have to build habits that support designing futures rather than reacting to problems.  David Emerald's 3 Vital Questions takes our focus from a problem to an outcome orientation.

Highlights from the Interview

These excerpts have been edited for context.

[07:10]  ...The first vital question is, Where are you putting your focus? The subtext to that is, are you focusing on problems, or are you focusing on outcomes? What informs that question is an organizing framework that I call FISBE. FISBE is an acronym that stands for Focus, Inner State and BEhavior. The idea is that what we focus on engages some emotional response. That inner state that then drives our behavior. 

[17:16] ...Vital Question Two is, How are you relating? How are you relating to others? How are you relating to your experience? And how are you relating to yourself? Are you relating in ways that produce, or perpetuate drama? Or are you relating in ways that empower others and yourself to be more resourceful, resilient and innovative?

If our orientation is problem-focused, fear-based and reactive in nature, that creates the environment and the conditions for the Dreaded Drama Triangle, or DDT, which I'll explain in more detail in just a moment. I also want to say that if we can consciously choose to operate as much as possible out of that Outcome Orientation, where we're focused on what we care about, that our inner state is more passion-based and we're taking creative action, that creates the conditions for a different set of relationship roles and dynamics that we call TED or The Empowerment Dynamic.

[31:29]: What actions are you taking? Are you merely reacting to the problems of the moment, or are you taking creative and generative action, including the solving of problems in service to outcomes? Dynamic tension informs the Third Vital Question.

[32:42]: The three basic steps of dynamic tension are first and foremost,  focus on the outcome and to be as clear as we can on the outcome, that the outcome can sometimes be clear and concrete, other times it may be more vague and directional.

Then the second step is to step back and tell the truth about, what's my current reality in relation to the outcome? That engages a tension between what we want and what we're currently experiencing.

The third piece of dynamic tension is to then determine and take baby steps that move from our current reality toward our envisioned outcome. Baby steps to me are things that as an individual, or team, we can choose to do that tend to be short-term and in organizational terms. LeeAnn, it could be as simple as, ‘I need to have a conversation’, or ‘we need to go gather this information’. It's just whenever the next little step is, that’s going to help us move toward and/or get clearer about the outcome.

More Links from this Episode

Download the Transcript

3 Vital Questions website

The Power of TED: The Empowerment Dynamic

3 Vital Questions:Transforming Workplace Drama

David Emerald

Donna Zajonc

Stephen Karpman's Drama Triangle

Bob Anderson

The Leadership Circle Profile

Robert Fritz:  Structural Tension

Stagen

After listening to the interview and reading the notes, I wonder what your takeaway is?

Thanks for tuning in!

LeeAnn

 

Your ratings and reviews on Apple Podcasts are greatly appreciated!  It only takes a minute!

 

 

Bob Anderson: Boot Up Your Inner Game

Bob Anderson: Boot Up Your Inner Game

April 7, 2020

Download Practices to Boot Up Your Inner Game  

Read in-depth notes on the Rise Leaders Radio Website (coming April 8)

Download the Episode Transcript

 

"A Creative style of leadership is driven by passion, purpose and vision and is about bringing into being what I care about and becoming who I most desire to be as a leader.  Reactive leadership is about responding to problems, fears and threats.

You can't create the kind of agile, adaptive innovative and engaged workplaces that we are trying to construct in order to thrive in a VUCA world.  You literally can't create those cultures and systems and structures from a Reactive leadership mindset."

- Bob Anderson, summarized quote

Bob Anderson is the creator of the Leadership Circle Profile, a groundbreaking 360 leadership assessment. We recorded this call on February 21st, 2020. The date is significant because the coronavirus had not yet reached pandemic status and there were no detected cases of community spread in the US. We don’t speak at all of the crisis in our interview and listening today it seems a bit tone-deaf. As you listen, I invite you to place the conversation in the context of the incredibly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous [VUCA] environment we’re living in.

Throughout the conversation, Bob talks about practices he personally engages in to deepen his own development. I’ve taken the liberty to document my version of those and I’ve provided a link to them in the episode notes and on my website at www.rise-leaders.com/podcast

We spend most of our time in this interview on the Creative and Reactive dimensions of the model and on the latest findings gathered from a database of write-in comments provided when leaders rate other leaders. Bob and Bill Adams’ latest book, Scaling Leadership, is based on this provocative data. 

Bob reviews the Top 10 Most-Endorsed Strengths for High Creative Leaders from this research (hint: people, people, people).

He shares his own examples of moving from a Reactive to Creative style of leadership and the deep reflection and stillness that is required to speak with authenticity and in a way that uses conflict generatively.

Links:

Full Circle Group

Bob Kegan

Socialized and Self-Authoring mindsets

Covey

Mastering Leadership

 

Conscious Capitalism: An Idea Whose Time Has Come with Alexander McCobin

Conscious Capitalism: An Idea Whose Time Has Come with Alexander McCobin

March 3, 2020

Expanded show notes on the Rise Leaders Radio website

Download the Transcript

Inching Towards Conscious Capitalism as Business as Usual

Conscious capitalism is a term, a movement and the name of the non-profit organization, Conscious Capitalism, Inc. (CCI), whose role is to be the foundation of the movement. CCI brings business leaders together to share best practices for implementing the ideals of conscious capitalism.

It’s hard to pinpoint exactly when and where the term originated, but aspects of conscious capitalism have been around for decades. As we discuss in the interview, Conscious Capitalism provides an organizing principle for many practices that put humans at the center of the business ecosystem.

Might we be so bold as to hope that the terms, conscious and social capitalism become redundant and that Alexandar McCobin gladly invests his passion in another worthy endeavor?  I believe it's a worthwhile place to invest one's energy. 

Tune in to learn more about the opportunities and challenges of the movement and perhaps even your personal role in supporting this sea change.

Play this podcast on Podbean App